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Making your customers happy

Consultant for Agronomic Solution And Quality Assurance

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CASAQA, The Quality House

A quality that generates revenue

Contact me here for a free no obligation chat



The Old approach to the “Quality” in the Food Business

The “cost of quality” isn’t the price of creating a quality product or service. It’s the cost of NOT creating a quality product or service. The aim is not to achieve the certification status. Instead, the quality system should enhance the model business  and it should work to create identities, values in favor of the market management 

With Casaqa

The purpose of this website is to introduce the market goal in the Food Safety, Environmental  and Quality System  in order to improve and innovate your productive system.  In others words, Casaqa prepares you to the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Are you Ready? Casaqa provides you a highly customized consultancy service. 

Why combine the business model innovation with quality management systems? 

BUSINESS MODEL INNOVATION: CREATING VALUE IN TIMES OF CHANGE

The central objectives of Business Model Innovation through the Quality System Management  is the creation of value (money) using the same resource.

For the first time, the target of your Quality Department will be generating revenue, actively helping the customer generation and the selling process.

In particular,
• We highlight business model innovation as an alternative for general managers and entrepreneurs to create new value, specifically in times of economic change.
• We develop a holistic, multi-dimensional, quality system management framework linked to the business model  assessment that centers on system-level design, as opposed to partial optimization of individual activities, and captures a range of interdependencies within and among business model design elements.
• We attempt to give managers and employers a “language” for business model innovation that can foster analysis, reflection and dialogue on the subject.

In addressing these objectives, we make three distinct contributions to the quality system management. First, we analyze and discuss business model innovation through the conceptual lens of activities, which to the best of our knowledge has not been accomplished with the same degree of focus elsewhere. Using the activity system as the level of analysis, and an activity as the unit of analysis, we introduce a set of parsimonious yet operational concepts for academics and managers alike who are interested in better understanding and/or harnessing the power of business model innovation.

Second, much of the extant literature on business model innovation has focused on the design new models. The ideas and concepts depicted in this paper are equally applicable to innovators of entirely new business models and to managers of focal firms that need to adapt their business model incrementally with the objective of achieving business model innovation that is new to the focal firm. This could be important for realizing small but meaningful business model improvements (as opposed to revolutionary, game-changing business model breakthroughs), and for improving the firm’s competitive position.

Last but not least, we contribute to the Quality System by proposing that even in times of economic crisis and resource scarcity, companies do not need to renounce innovation as a way of enhancing their performance prospects. Rather, managers need to understand the opportunities offered by (relatively cheap) business model innovation to complement, if not substitute (relatively costly) innovation in products or processes.

The continuous improvement  was the only target for the Quality Departement as a part of a company. With Casaqa you can increase the contribute of these activities to link the way to create your value to the marketing activities.

Get to know me better
Target Clients
  • Salad-Herbs Farmers
  • Fresh Food Industries
  • Baby leaf Farms
  • Retailers and Supermarkets
  • Frozen Food Companies
  • Certification Bodies

How do we doing?

  • Food Safety Systems for Fresh Food Companies
  • Agronomic Solutions and Innovations 
  • Quality System for Fresh Food Companies
  • Specialized in baby leaf salad crops production
  • Audit

Your benefits

  • Improve your Business Model just using your internal resource and your Quality Management System
  • An holistic perspective on how business is conducted, rather than a focus on any particular function such as product market strategy, marketing,  quality or operations;
  • An emphasis on value creation for all business model participants, as opposed to an exclusive focus on value capture.
  • Organic Production of  baby leaf salad crops
  • Marks & Spencer Auditor 
My Framework
  • This is not a big consulting company that writes paperworks to overcome the audit. My service is to stand with my client for his customer.
  • A manager at your disposal
  • Max 8 clients per years
  • Free Farm/Company Visit and Assessment 
  • Weekly Skype meeting
  • Training course include 

"How companies do business will often be as, or more, important than what they do.” IBM

Crop Specialist

Crop Specialist

Making simple all farm operations

Food Safety System

Food Safety System

Wear a coverhead and let's go

Environmental Management Systems

Environmental Management Systems

Agronomy for sustainable development

Pure Salad Project

Pure Salad Project

Pure Salad Project

Quality Management System Canvas

Quality Management System Canvas

Strengthening your business with the Canvas Method

If we work together, you’ll have more customers

Eliminate your customer visiting stress by using Casaqa
Add Value

The truth is that there are no tricks and shortcuts to add value to a company. Anyway it is a question of mentality. We must be able to see the “quality systems” and the sustainable development  as an opportunity to create the market. Prior to even coming on board with my potential client, I usually evaluate the model business to see what problems there are on the surface. My “due diligence assessment” is free.

Quality System Management with the Canvas Method

The companies that want to improve itself in the food market, they integrate in a single “canvas” all the elements that are part of their business with the focus of the quality system .

I work from this integrative vision with each organization, strengthening its long-term value.

I can help you to achieve one or more goals under conditions of uncertainty. The Strategic thinking is one of our characteristic that make us different respect others consultants. When applied in an organizational strategic management process, strategic thinking involves the generation and application of unique business insights and opportunities intended to create competitive advantage for a firm or organisation.

Integrated Quality System

IFS, BRC, Field to Fork, ISO 9001, FSSC 22000, ISO 22005, ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001, SA 8000, GlobalGAP, LEAF Marque, Tesco Nurture, Primus GFSI.These are the schemes that I manage and I combine into a single system.

My commitment is to consider all aspects of a company and especially their market and model business in order to continually improve their performance and to innovate the process flow. All process should be integrated in the strategic plan. Do you have a strategic plan?

Solid System

Many companies struggle with quality management systems fundamentals because of recurring quality issues. Our way to do Quality System is committed to the production of safe food considering the real world. I do not tell you what to do, but how you have to do.

I took a web design course through the Monster Academy of Andreo.li. So now I can build and manage the website directly. Casaqa is born to be a voice in the fresh salad business: an international and technical point of view.

Pier Paolo BacciuCasaqa Creator

By far the best team I've ever worked with. They truly understood the look I was going for and completely nailed it! I would highly recommend them as a company, you simply just won't find any better team!

Aura BrooksGraphic Designer, Owl Eyes

Growing emotion

Tizio CaioDr. example

Grow salad and herbs for the fresh food industry

is a challenge that increasingly involves

food safety, respect for the environment, 

sustainable development.

This is CASAQA, the House of the Quality. The website platform of Pier Paolo Bacciu.

It’s a company  located between Italy and Spain. I pride myself on developing unique and professional solutions with a wide variety of mediums. Take a look around and don’t be shy.

What I can help you achieve

Farming Organization | Food Safety & Quality System optimization | New Baby Leaf Farm Design and Start Up | Standing out in the crowd

Seven strategies to reduce pesticide usage.

By | Agronomy, Food Safety | No Comments

Pesticides play a sensitive role in food systems: they are applied in order to protect crops, but they can have negative impacts on environment and human health. While global pesticide use has grown to 3.5 billion kg active ingredients per year, a significant portion of the chemicals applied has proved to be excessive, uneconomic or unnecessary both in industrialized and developing countries.

Today there is a consensus among a wide range of stakeholders that pesticide use needs to be gradually reduced to a level that is effectively required to ensure crop production, and that risks of pesticide application need to be reduced as far as possible.

Here are listed 7 strategies available for pesticide reduction.

1. Agronomic practices.

Suitable agronomic practices are essential to achieve healthy crops and to prevent build-up of pest, disease and weed pressure. The following practices are of particular importance:

  • Appropriate plant nutrition and soil fertility management;
  • Crop rotation;
  • Appropriate irrigation management;
  • Appropriate timing of sowing or planting and of intercultural operations in order to reduce pest;
  • Timely shallow tillage reduces weed populations and at the same time improves nutrient supply to the crop;
  • Precision farming like spraying of hot-spots and weeding with optical detectors;
  • Intercropping (when it is possible) and the use of variety mixtures limits the spread of pests and diseases and provides food and shelter for natural enemies of pests;

2. Resistant crops

Crops and crop varieties differ in their susceptibility to pests and diseases and in their ability to compete with weeds. Growing crops suitable for local conditions and selecting appropriate crop varieties is therefore fundamental to a preventive pest management system. The use of resistant varieties together with rotations of non-susceptible crops can substantially limit pest build-up within a field.

3. Bio-control and Natural Pesticides

Bio-control makes use of pathogens (bacteria, fungi, viruses), insect predators or parasitoids, pheromones and insect traps to keep pest populations low.

The total eradication of a pest, which results from the use of synthetic pesticides, would reduce the food supply of the pest’s natural enemies, undermining a key element in system resilience. The aim, therefore, should be to manage insect pest populations to the point where natural predation operates in a balanced way and crop losses to pests are kept to an acceptable minimum.

4. Integrated Pest Management (IPM)

IPM is an ecosystem approach that does not seek to eradicate pests – but rather to manage them. It is founded on the idea that the first and most fundamental line of defense against pests and diseases in agriculture is a healthy agro-ecosystem, in which the biological processes that underpin production are protected, encouraged and enhanced.

A close approach to these principles is the common GlobalG.A.P. protocol even if it is not totally focused on pest prevention. The majority of retailers in today’s markets require certain standards that ensure safe and sustainable agriculture for demonstrating on-farm food safety and sustainability.

In a true IPM strong focus is on pest prevention by applying good agronomic practices and using resistant varieties, pest identification and monitoring and biological pest control. As soon as the economic threshold is achieved – the point at which the cost of pesticide use pays off (cost of expected loss in harvest exceeds the cost of treatment) – chemical pest control becomes profitable. The last step includes learning and adapting from IPM for the next crop season.

5. Agroecology

Agroecology is a discipline that defines, classifies and studies agricultural systems from an ecological and socio-economic perspective, and applies ecological concepts and principles to the design and management of sustainable agroecosystems. It is an integrative way of farming that focuses on working with and understanding the interactions between plants, animals, humans and the environment. In Agroecology pest control seeks to reinforce interactions of pests and natural enemies with the aim to maintain a natural balance in the ecosystem. While there is no consent on what techniques and inputs are compatible with agroecology the common denominator is to make use of biodiversity-based ecological processes to optimize agricultural production systems.

6. Organic Agriculture

Organic agriculture is a production system that sustains the health of soils, ecosystems and people. It relies on ecological processes, biodiversity and cycles adapted to local conditions, rather than the use of inputs with adverse effects. Organic standards strictly prohibit any use of synthetic pesticides. Crop protection in organic agriculture builds on good agronomic practices such as crop rotation and intercropping, the use of organic manures, resistant varieties and bio-control to prevent that pest, diseases and weeds cause significant damage.

Organic farming makes use of techniques similar to Integrated Pest Management and agroecology, with the only difference that synthetic chemicals cannot be used as a last resort.

Instead, organic farmers can use specific natural substances permitted by organic standards to control pests and diseases if preventive methods are not sufficient. Some of them, however, also have unwanted side effects on non-target organisms. Particularly the use of copper to control fungal diseases is problematic due to its accumulation in soils.

7. Use of less hazardous pesticides

There are various systems to classify pesticides as per their toxicity for humans and the environment. Phasing out the use of highly hazardous pesticides and replacing them with less hazardous ones is therefore the most obvious way to reduce the negative side-effects of pesticides.

This approach needs to be combined with safe handling of pesticides so that their impact on people and the environment is minimized. The use of protective gear and the observation of waiting periods before harvest are the most important measures in this regard.

However, in many countries the lack of information, unavailability of protective equipment and its impracticality in hot and humid climates result in low adoption rates.

Source: Frank Eyhorn, Tina Roner, Heiko Specking September 2015

Seven strategies to reduce pesticide usage.

By | Agronomy, Food Safety | No Comments

Pesticides play a sensitive role in food systems: they are applied in order to protect crops, but they can have negative impacts on environment and human health. While global pesticide use has grown to 3.5 billion kg active ingredients per year, a significant portion of the chemicals applied has proved to be excessive, uneconomic or unnecessary both in industrialized and developing countries.

Today there is a consensus among a wide range of stakeholders that pesticide use needs to be gradually reduced to a level that is effectively required to ensure crop production, and that risks of pesticide application need to be reduced as far as possible.

Here are listed 7 strategies available for pesticide reduction.

1. Agronomic practices.

Suitable agronomic practices are essential to achieve healthy crops and to prevent build-up of pest, disease and weed pressure. The following practices are of particular importance:

  • Appropriate plant nutrition and soil fertility management;
  • Crop rotation;
  • Appropriate irrigation management;
  • Appropriate timing of sowing or planting and of intercultural operations in order to reduce pest;
  • Timely shallow tillage reduces weed populations and at the same time improves nutrient supply to the crop;
  • Precision farming like spraying of hot-spots and weeding with optical detectors;
  • Intercropping (when it is possible) and the use of variety mixtures limits the spread of pests and diseases and provides food and shelter for natural enemies of pests;

2. Resistant crops

Crops and crop varieties differ in their susceptibility to pests and diseases and in their ability to compete with weeds. Growing crops suitable for local conditions and selecting appropriate crop varieties is therefore fundamental to a preventive pest management system. The use of resistant varieties together with rotations of non-susceptible crops can substantially limit pest build-up within a field.

3. Bio-control and Natural Pesticides

Bio-control makes use of pathogens (bacteria, fungi, viruses), insect predators or parasitoids, pheromones and insect traps to keep pest populations low.

The total eradication of a pest, which results from the use of synthetic pesticides, would reduce the food supply of the pest’s natural enemies, undermining a key element in system resilience. The aim, therefore, should be to manage insect pest populations to the point where natural predation operates in a balanced way and crop losses to pests are kept to an acceptable minimum.

4. Integrated Pest Management (IPM)

IPM is an ecosystem approach that does not seek to eradicate pests – but rather to manage them. It is founded on the idea that the first and most fundamental line of defense against pests and diseases in agriculture is a healthy agro-ecosystem, in which the biological processes that underpin production are protected, encouraged and enhanced.

A close approach to these principles is the common GlobalG.A.P. protocol even if it is not totally focused on pest prevention. The majority of retailers in today’s markets require certain standards that ensure safe and sustainable agriculture for demonstrating on-farm food safety and sustainability.

In a true IPM strong focus is on pest prevention by applying good agronomic practices and using resistant varieties, pest identification and monitoring and biological pest control. As soon as the economic threshold is achieved – the point at which the cost of pesticide use pays off (cost of expected loss in harvest exceeds the cost of treatment) – chemical pest control becomes profitable. The last step includes learning and adapting from IPM for the next crop season.

5. Agroecology

Agroecology is a discipline that defines, classifies and studies agricultural systems from an ecological and socio-economic perspective, and applies ecological concepts and principles to the design and management of sustainable agroecosystems. It is an integrative way of farming that focuses on working with and understanding the interactions between plants, animals, humans and the environment. In Agroecology pest control seeks to reinforce interactions of pests and natural enemies with the aim to maintain a natural balance in the ecosystem. While there is no consent on what techniques and inputs are compatible with agroecology the common denominator is to make use of biodiversity-based ecological processes to optimize agricultural production systems.

6. Organic Agriculture

Organic agriculture is a production system that sustains the health of soils, ecosystems and people. It relies on ecological processes, biodiversity and cycles adapted to local conditions, rather than the use of inputs with adverse effects. Organic standards strictly prohibit any use of synthetic pesticides. Crop protection in organic agriculture builds on good agronomic practices such as crop rotation and intercropping, the use of organic manures, resistant varieties and bio-control to prevent that pest, diseases and weeds cause significant damage.

Organic farming makes use of techniques similar to Integrated Pest Management and agroecology, with the only difference that synthetic chemicals cannot be used as a last resort.

Instead, organic farmers can use specific natural substances permitted by organic standards to control pests and diseases if preventive methods are not sufficient. Some of them, however, also have unwanted side effects on non-target organisms. Particularly the use of copper to control fungal diseases is problematic due to its accumulation in soils.

7. Use of less hazardous pesticides

There are various systems to classify pesticides as per their toxicity for humans and the environment. Phasing out the use of highly hazardous pesticides and replacing them with less hazardous ones is therefore the most obvious way to reduce the negative side-effects of pesticides.

This approach needs to be combined with safe handling of pesticides so that their impact on people and the environment is minimized. The use of protective gear and the observation of waiting periods before harvest are the most important measures in this regard.

However, in many countries the lack of information, unavailability of protective equipment and its impracticality in hot and humid climates result in low adoption rates.

Source: Frank Eyhorn, Tina Roner, Heiko Specking September 2015

Seven strategies to reduce pesticide usage.

By | Agronomy, Food Safety | No Comments

Pesticides play a sensitive role in food systems: they are applied in order to protect crops, but they can have negative impacts on environment and human health. While global pesticide use has grown to 3.5 billion kg active ingredients per year, a significant portion of the chemicals applied has proved to be excessive, uneconomic or unnecessary both in industrialized and developing countries.

Today there is a consensus among a wide range of stakeholders that pesticide use needs to be gradually reduced to a level that is effectively required to ensure crop production, and that risks of pesticide application need to be reduced as far as possible.

Here are listed 7 strategies available for pesticide reduction.

1. Agronomic practices.

Suitable agronomic practices are essential to achieve healthy crops and to prevent build-up of pest, disease and weed pressure. The following practices are of particular importance:

  • Appropriate plant nutrition and soil fertility management;
  • Crop rotation;
  • Appropriate irrigation management;
  • Appropriate timing of sowing or planting and of intercultural operations in order to reduce pest;
  • Timely shallow tillage reduces weed populations and at the same time improves nutrient supply to the crop;
  • Precision farming like spraying of hot-spots and weeding with optical detectors;
  • Intercropping (when it is possible) and the use of variety mixtures limits the spread of pests and diseases and provides food and shelter for natural enemies of pests;

2. Resistant crops

Crops and crop varieties differ in their susceptibility to pests and diseases and in their ability to compete with weeds. Growing crops suitable for local conditions and selecting appropriate crop varieties is therefore fundamental to a preventive pest management system. The use of resistant varieties together with rotations of non-susceptible crops can substantially limit pest build-up within a field.

3. Bio-control and Natural Pesticides

Bio-control makes use of pathogens (bacteria, fungi, viruses), insect predators or parasitoids, pheromones and insect traps to keep pest populations low.

The total eradication of a pest, which results from the use of synthetic pesticides, would reduce the food supply of the pest’s natural enemies, undermining a key element in system resilience. The aim, therefore, should be to manage insect pest populations to the point where natural predation operates in a balanced way and crop losses to pests are kept to an acceptable minimum.

4. Integrated Pest Management (IPM)

IPM is an ecosystem approach that does not seek to eradicate pests – but rather to manage them. It is founded on the idea that the first and most fundamental line of defense against pests and diseases in agriculture is a healthy agro-ecosystem, in which the biological processes that underpin production are protected, encouraged and enhanced.

A close approach to these principles is the common GlobalG.A.P. protocol even if it is not totally focused on pest prevention. The majority of retailers in today’s markets require certain standards that ensure safe and sustainable agriculture for demonstrating on-farm food safety and sustainability.

In a true IPM strong focus is on pest prevention by applying good agronomic practices and using resistant varieties, pest identification and monitoring and biological pest control. As soon as the economic threshold is achieved – the point at which the cost of pesticide use pays off (cost of expected loss in harvest exceeds the cost of treatment) – chemical pest control becomes profitable. The last step includes learning and adapting from IPM for the next crop season.

5. Agroecology

Agroecology is a discipline that defines, classifies and studies agricultural systems from an ecological and socio-economic perspective, and applies ecological concepts and principles to the design and management of sustainable agroecosystems. It is an integrative way of farming that focuses on working with and understanding the interactions between plants, animals, humans and the environment. In Agroecology pest control seeks to reinforce interactions of pests and natural enemies with the aim to maintain a natural balance in the ecosystem. While there is no consent on what techniques and inputs are compatible with agroecology the common denominator is to make use of biodiversity-based ecological processes to optimize agricultural production systems.

6. Organic Agriculture

Organic agriculture is a production system that sustains the health of soils, ecosystems and people. It relies on ecological processes, biodiversity and cycles adapted to local conditions, rather than the use of inputs with adverse effects. Organic standards strictly prohibit any use of synthetic pesticides. Crop protection in organic agriculture builds on good agronomic practices such as crop rotation and intercropping, the use of organic manures, resistant varieties and bio-control to prevent that pest, diseases and weeds cause significant damage.

Organic farming makes use of techniques similar to Integrated Pest Management and agroecology, with the only difference that synthetic chemicals cannot be used as a last resort.

Instead, organic farmers can use specific natural substances permitted by organic standards to control pests and diseases if preventive methods are not sufficient. Some of them, however, also have unwanted side effects on non-target organisms. Particularly the use of copper to control fungal diseases is problematic due to its accumulation in soils.

7. Use of less hazardous pesticides

There are various systems to classify pesticides as per their toxicity for humans and the environment. Phasing out the use of highly hazardous pesticides and replacing them with less hazardous ones is therefore the most obvious way to reduce the negative side-effects of pesticides.

This approach needs to be combined with safe handling of pesticides so that their impact on people and the environment is minimized. The use of protective gear and the observation of waiting periods before harvest are the most important measures in this regard.

However, in many countries the lack of information, unavailability of protective equipment and its impracticality in hot and humid climates result in low adoption rates.

Source: Frank Eyhorn, Tina Roner, Heiko Specking September 2015

Build a Beautiful Baby Leaf  Farm

With Pier Paolo Bacciu